Resource Governance

This programme focus on natural resource governance, budget monitoring and capital flight. The programme should not be interpreted as a broad accountable governance programme, but focusing on accountable governance related to natural resources and other public resources to achieve economic justice.

Despite a number of developing countries being rich in natural resources; people still live in poverty because governments do not secure revenue and fail to distribute the resources in a way that eradicates poverty and redresses inequality. The Resource Governance (RG) programme’s goal is for women and men to benefit from public resources through accountable governance for equitable distribution of wealth and sustainable development. Main intervention strategies are community mobilisation and advocacy towards legal and corporate dutybearers, in order to hold them accountable for public resource governance.

In 2016, through our resource governance program, we have equipped almost 1000 people with the tools they need to hold authorities accountable. This is vital to ensure that policies address the needs and rights of the poor.
In 2016, through our resource governance program, we have equipped almost 1000 people with the tools they need to hold authorities accountable. This is vital to ensure that policies address the needs and rights of the poor.

The programme is a continuation of the previous strategic period’s Resources and Finance Programme and hence results from 2016 build on years of strategic capacity building and positioning of civil society platforms initiated and strengthened by NCA and partners. The main change from the previous period is a more targeted focus on natural resource governance, budget monitoring and capital flight.

Alternative Mining Indaba, a conference for fair distribution of resources from the African mining industry. The mining industry in Africa has the potential to contribute to development, but unfortunately large companies are eliminating most of the profits. Local communities are left with miserable working conditions and environmental problems. The march went through the streets of Cape Town and eventually met both mining companies and authorities who received the message that they must take responsibility for the mining industry contributing to social justice and development. Photo: Kjetil Abildsnes / Norwegian Church Aid.
Alternative Mining Indaba, a conference for fair distribution of resources from the African mining industry. The mining industry in Africa has the potential to contribute to development, but unfortunately large companies are eliminating most of the profits. Local communities are left with miserable working conditions and environmental problems. The march went through the streets of Cape Town and eventually met both mining companies and authorities who received the message that they must take responsibility for the mining industry contributing to social justice and development. Photo: Kjetil Abildsnes / Norwegian Church Aid.

RESULTS CASE:

Faith leaders advocate for mining affected communities’ rights